Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada

Research in British Columbia & Yukon

Researchers

Project Title
Researcher
Research Area
Affiliation
Funding Term
Funding
The Role of EBV, B cells and NKT cells in MS Dr. Peter van den Elzen Cause and Risk Factors The University of British Columbia 2018-2021 $316 500
Elucidating the mechanistic role of latent EBV infection in the etiology of MS Dr. Marc Horwitz Cause and Risk Factors University of British Columbia 2017-2020 $354 048
Establising an Imaging Biomarker for Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis Dr. Shannon Kolind Therapy and Clinical Tool Development University of British Columbia 2017-2020 $292 500
The importance of diffusely abnormal white matter on disability and progression in multiple sclerosis: insights from imaging and immunology Dr. Cornelia Laule Therapy and Clinical Tool Development The University of British Columbia 2015-2019 $343 726.80
The pathologic basis of magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis Dr. George Robert Moore Therapy and Clinical Tool Development University of British Columbia 2018-2021 $350 212.42
Characterizing the neuroprotective roles of bHLH proteins Npas4 and ARNT2 in inflammatory neurodegeneration related to multiple sclerosis Dr. Jacqueline Quandt Mechanisms of Disease - Mechanisms of Progression University of British Columbia 2018-2021 $346 400
Targeting Oligodendrocyte Maturation for the Study of Axonal Survival Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff Mechanisms of Disease - Repair The University of British Columbia 2016-2019 $341 411
Assessing safety monitoring in patients taking oral multiple sclerosis treatments [ASYMPTOTE] Dr. Helen Tremlett Therapy and Clinical Tool Development The University of British Columbia 2015-2019 $286 694.37
Human immunodeficiency virus, antiretroviral drugs and multiple sclerosis risk (HIV-MS) Dr. Helen Tremlett Cause and Risk Factors University of British Columbia 2018-2021 $299 979
It’s a fungal world: the mycobiome in pediatric MS Dr. Helen Tremlett Cause and Risk Factors University of British Columbia 2018-2021 $50 000

Trainees

Project Title
Trainee
Affiliation
Award
Research Area
Project Description


A humanized mouse model of MS to study EBV infection in disease Jessica Allanach The University of British Columbia Studentship PhD Cause and Risk Factors The aim of the research is to create and characterize mouse models of MS that incorporate infection with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), which is heavily implicated as an environmental cofactor in disease but challenging to study experimentally.
Diffusely Abnormal White Matter in Different MS Phenotypes: Impact on Myelin, Axons and Brain Volume Hanwen Liu The University of British Columbia Studentship PhD Therapy and clinical tool development This project is using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image myelin, particularly an advanced MRI technique called myelin water imaging.
Relationship Between Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Latency and the onset of Multiple Sclerosis Ana Citlali Márquez The University of British Columbia Studentship PhD Cause and Risk Factors The study investigates how Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can lead to the development of MS using a mouse model of MS that is infected with a similar virus to EBV. The project will explore how the virus changes the mice’s immune system before and during a disease progression.
Assessing the functional capacity of the Gut Microbiome in Pediatric MS Ali Mirza Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre Studentship PhD Cause and Risk Factors The project will invvestigate how the gut bacteria’s functional capacity (actions) differ between children with and without multiple sclerosis.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Human Spinal Cord in Multiple Sclerosis Carina Graf The University of British Columbia Studentship Msc Therapy and clinical tool development This project investigates the nature of changes in the spinal cord of people living with MS using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In contrast to standard MRI techniques, advanced MRI will be able to specify what changes are happening in the spinal cord.
Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Clinical Progression in Multiple Sclerosis using Brain MRIs Marco Law The University of British Columbia Studentship Msc Therapy and clinical tool development The project focuses on applying artificial intelligence for the prediction of MS disease progression using magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data. This would provide vital information for patients to make better informed decisions regarding disease management.