Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada

Outcome and Management of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Multiple Sclerosis: ‘Heart-MS’

Principal Investigator: Dr. Ruth Ann Marrie

Affiliation: University of Manitoba

Term: April 1, 2016 – March 31, 2019

Funding: $285,375

Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, incidence, mortality

Summary:

  • Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in multiple sclerosis (MS). The frequency of heart disease also appears higher in persons with MS than in persons without MS.
  • It is unknown if people with MS are treated differently when they develop heart disease, or if their heart disease is not extensive enough to require monitoring and care.
  • The research team will:
    • Examine the risk factors for having a heart attack in MS and see if these are different than in people without MS.
    • Compare treatment and outcomes after a heart attack in people with and without MS.

Project Description:

Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in people living with MS. The frequency of heart disease also appears to be higher in people with MS than in those without MS. Interestingly, Dr. Ruth Ann Marrie’s earlier work suggests that people with MS are less likely to undergo procedures to treat heart disease, which suggests that people with MS are treated differently when they develop heart disease, or that their heart disease is not extensive to require healthcare. In this study, Dr. Marrie will compare risk factors, treatments and outcomes for heart attack among people with and without MS. This will be investigated using health claims data in British Columbia and Manitoba. Preliminary findings to date suggest that individuals with MS are at a 20-30% increased risk of having a heart attack. Ongoing work is analyzing the health claims data to determine the treatment outcomes following a heart attack in people with MS.

Potential Impact: The findings from this study will be important for persons with MS and for their health care providers by providing information about prognosis after having a heart attack and suggesting areas for improvements in clinical care.

Project Status: In Progress