A double-blind placebo-controlled study of mixed-amphetamine salts, extended release (Adderall XR) for cognitive impairment in MS

Principal Investigator: Dr. Sarah Morrow

Affiliation: London Health Sciences Centre

Term: April 1, 2016 – March 31, 2019

Funding: $161,324

Keywords: amphetamine, quality of life, cognition, intervention

Summary:

  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS) causes problems with mobility, balance, and vision and can frequently affect cognition. Specifically, in relation to cognition, MS frequently affects processing speed (PS), or the ability to take in and interpret information quickly and meaningfully, and also affects memory.
  • Although a large portion of the MS population is affected by these symptoms, there are no known or approved treatments.
  • The research team will:
    • Examine the effects of a medication called Adderall XR, a slow release amphetamine medication, on PS, memory, fatigue, mood, symptoms, and quality of life in persons with MS demonstrating impaired PS.

Project Description:

MS frequently affects PS, or the ability to take in and interpret information quickly and meaningfully, and also affects memory. Although many people with MS are affected by these symptoms, there are no known or approved treatments. Dr. Morrow’s study proposes to examine the effects of a medication currently approved for attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder called Adderall XR, in persons with MS demonstrating impaired PS. Previous research by Dr. Morrow has shown that this medication may improve PS in people with MS, but more research is needed to support this theory. This study, which has recruited 36 participants to date, is paramount in establishing if the medication can be repurposed to treat a common cognitive challenge in people with MS.

Potential Impact: Provide support for Adderall XR to relieve from impairment, and in turn, positively affect the quality of life, enabling individuals to participate fully in the community in terms of social and work activities, and allow future integration of this treatment into clinical practice.

Project Status: In Progress

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